Corowa – the ICE fight

COROWA’S ICE WAR

Corowa Free Press 25.06.2014 – by Jason Marks

COROWA POLICE AT FOREFRONT

According to Corowa police, they have battled an influx of ice locally for the best part of 18 months, trying to curb the influence of this addictive drug that is crippling communities all over the country.

“We are making some inroads, but this is a battle that I think will be fought out for a long, long time,” said Sergeant Andrew Robertson of Corowa Police.

“The last 18 months we have seen an upward trend in the use of this drug and it is having a profound impact on our community.

“The rise in this drugs’ profile has been well documented and Corowa is certainly not hidden from it.”

EFFECTS OF THE DRUG

Ice produces a ‘rush’ effect that is intense, and depending on how many times it is consumed, can last between four and twelve hours.

Users experience feelings of exhilaration and increased arousal and activity levels, so much so that the body struggles to produce these feelings naturally.

When ice is used, the receptors in the brain are flooded with monoamines.

These receptors are destroyed with the more that is taken and prolonged use can lead to a point when the user no longer feels pleasure without further ice use.

NO CLEAR END TO FIGHT

Although there has been some success of late, this battle against the drug has no clear end date.

Sergeant Robertson said ice wasn’t just affecting the stereotypical drug user, but rather was being used by people “from all walks of life”.

CRIME FOLLOWS DRUG

“People you would least expect are indulging in it,” he said. According to police, in the past six months crimes that can be directly linked to the use of ice have risen dramatically, including breaking and entering and other theft related crime.

Although there has been some success of late, including a number of arrests, the issue is still a major concern for police.

“There have been some wins for police, albeit small,” Sergeant Robertson said.

“Some arrests lately have been positive for us, but it will not immediately stop the drug trade in this region.

“Each arrest and charge is a dent in the overall trade, but the best we can do at the moment is stalling them and upset their routines.

“I don’t see the fight ending in a hurry.”

COMMUNITY CAN SUPPORT POLICE

While the fight against drugs is expected to be long and arduous, Sergeant Robertson pleaded with the community to have faith in his team’s ability to come out on top.

He said the community could also play their role in stamping out the ice issue.

“There are perceptions that police are doing nothing to stop the trend of drugs in this area, which is not the case,” Sergeant Robertson said.

“Our team, in conjunction with the Albury Drugs Unit, are working around the clock to get a positive result.

“There are instances where a case may take longer than expected, but we aim to get it right and deliver a result by putting people in front of the courts.

“This is something we have had some good success with lately, but we can’t do it alone.”

BE ALERT – REPORT THE UNUSUAL TO POLICE

Sergeant Robertson urged the community to report anything unusual they notice – regardless of how minor it might seem.

“It may seem like nothing, but it could hold the key to solving crime in this area,” he said.

“We need people to report what they see – we will decide if it has any meaning to a case or not.

“If people are meeting at strange times or in strange places, let us know.

“FIGHTING DRUGS IS A TEAM EFFORT”

“I have said it before and will say it until I go blue, fighting drugs is a team effort that we all have to chip in for.

“Getting people in front of the courts is what we do and what we hope to continue to do until it stops.

“We won’t be backing down.”

…………………………………………………………………..

Return to main ice page.

Advertisements